Martine Jean

Martine Jean

2019-2020 Mark Claster Mamolen Fellow
Martine Jean
Martine Jean is a historian of crime and punishment 19th century Brazil. Her research probes the history of confinement and its intersection with slavery, poverty, and race-making in nineteenth-century Brazil as well as their implications for understanding mass incarceration, race, and citizenship in the post-emancipation period in the Americas. During her time at the WIGH and ALARI, she will complete her book manuscript entitled "Routine Imprisonment, Race, and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Brazil, 1830-1890" under contract at the University of Texas Press. The research is supported by a 2018 NEH Summer Stipends. My work has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Atlantic Studies: Global Currents, entitled "A Storehouse of Prisoners: Rio de Janeiro's Correction House (Casa de Correção) and the Birth of the Penitentiary in Brazil, 1830-1906", online October 24, 2016; in print: Vol, 14, issue 2, July 2017. A second article, "Worthy of Freedom: Abolitionist Discourse on Slavery, Freedom, and Imprisonment in Late Nineteenth-Century Brazil" is published by the Journal of Social History (November, 2017). A forthcoming article on the utilisation of a mixed free and unfree labor force to build the Casa de Correção will be published in the Internal Review of Social History in spring 2019. More on her work can be found at https://harvard.academia.edu/MartineJean

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